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International Journal of Innovation and Scientific Research
ISSN: 2351-8014
 
 
Friday 05 June 2020

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  Call for Papers (June 2020)  
 
 
 

PERCEPTION AND PRACTICE OF INTERMITTENT PREVENTION TREATMENT OF MALARIA AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTE-NATAL CLINICS IN IBADAN NORTH EAST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA


Volume 11, Issue 2, November 2014, Pages 533–542

 PERCEPTION AND PRACTICE OF INTERMITTENT PREVENTION TREATMENT OF MALARIA AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTE-NATAL CLINICS IN IBADAN NORTH EAST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA

Oluwakemi I. Adeniji and Foluso C. Odesola

Original language: English

Received 12 September 2014

Copyright © 2014 ISSR Journals. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract


Malaria contributes to 11% of maternal deaths in Nigeria (McGregor, 1984). These women are infected with Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent Plasmodium with serious health consequences.
This study therefore was designed to assess the perception and practice of Intermittent Prevention Treatment of malaria among pregnant women attending ante-natal clinics in Ibadan North East Local Government Area.
The study was a cross sectional surveys in which 99 respondents were interviewed. Data on demography, perception, practice, knowledge and barriers to the use of IPT were collected and were analyzed using descriptive statistics.
Thirty three (33.3%) of the respondent are between the ages of 31-35 years, while 25(25.3%) are within the age range of 26-30 years. Perception of pregnant women receiving IPT for malaria shows that IPT is very effective 32 (32.3%), while 60(60.6%) agrees that IPT drugs are readily available for pregnant women. Also, the study shows that71 (71.7%) had benefited from the program of IPT before, and 39 (39.4%) often attends seminars on malaria. On knowledge of pregnant women on IPT for malaria, 56(56.6%) reveals reliability of IPT materials, 61(61.6%) agreed that SP-drugs has no side effect on them, and 58(58.6%) said low birth weight, still birth are effects of malaria in pregnancy. Moreover, the barriers to the use of IPT for malaria among pregnant women include inadequate information about its use 30(30.6%), inadequate storage facility 43(43.4%), abuse of SP-drugs 51(51.5%), and, hoarding of IPT materials by medical staff 25(25.3%).
The study therefore recommends that government should ensure that IPT program for malaria is properly monitored and adequate supplies should be made.

Author Keywords: Antenatal clinic, Malaria, Intermittent preventive therapy, Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine.


How to Cite this Article


Oluwakemi I. Adeniji and Foluso C. Odesola, “PERCEPTION AND PRACTICE OF INTERMITTENT PREVENTION TREATMENT OF MALARIA AMONG PREGNANT WOMEN ATTENDING ANTE-NATAL CLINICS IN IBADAN NORTH EAST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA,” International Journal of Innovation and Scientific Research, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 533–542, November 2014.